What will be . . .

Yesterday was another turning point for the United States. For some, the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn DOMA may have been seen as an end of the world moment; for others, it may be as a ray of light shining on a world mired in intolerance and hate. I understand the extremity of viewpoints and realize the emotion which dominates those views are in time diminished by witnessing the consequences aren’t what they initially perceived. Perhaps because I have lived through several phases of change in our country and it’s attitudes toward each other, I believe things will get better. Clearly civil rights, which afforded equality to all citizens in this country were a break through moment. Can anyone honestly suggest reversal of executive, legislative and judicial decisions surrounding this social change in our country, would be good for any of us? It took several hundred years, from the time the first European set foot on this hemisphere’s soil, up to the 1960’s for there to be an honest evolutionary emancipation of those whose ancestry can be traced back to Africa but were born in the US. It was to be as much of their birth right to have full and equal citizenship under our Constitution as any whose ancestry could be traced back to Europe.

Even after this long awaited social and civil restoration of all rights to every citizen of this nation, there were organizations which devotedly held belief in the supremacy of Caucasian heritage over those who were not. Over time, most of these organizations altered their views and organizational principles. For some of those organizations to remain viable, they began to embrace all of their brothers and sisters to the point where it’s as if there never was a division or an exclusion in the beginning. Records may show this discrepancy in those less than tolerant organizations, however for the more recently involved members, it is as if there never was a problem.

I have no desire to be involved romantically or sexually with someone of the same gender. I’m long past the concern to whom I should marry or whom I will be friends. I’ve known and had homosexual friends from over 40 years ago, and this still didn’t alter my sexual choice. I had a cousin, who was known to be gay, played around him as a child, sang songs with him while listening to his 45’s, rode together in the back seat of a car on long family trips and that didn’t affect me choosing to volunteer for the Marines during the Viet Nam war or getting married and raising 4 children. Perhaps if anyone else is so concerned about how it will affect your children or someone else’s children, rest assured they will be who they are no matter what you believe.

Icon for Wikimedia project´s LGBT portal (Port...

Icon for Wikimedia project´s LGBT portal (Portal:LGBT). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I believe an expanding tolerance for LGBT rights will be the result in yesterday’s decision by the Supreme court. Obviously no one can predict the future but if the recent civil rights history has demonstrated, prejudice eventually melts away and previously held convictions of intolerance wither with those who also do. When intolerance, hatred, discrimination, disdain and disfellowship are held in full public view, the once accepted principles of injustice or intolerance become dust to be dissipated in the winds of time. I realize there will be many which find yesterdays decision a folly or worse a sin against all that is holy and to those who feel that way, I wish you well. Time may heal your wounds but the inevitable happens even when you reluctantly and willfully attempt to obstruct progress.

education leads toward tolerance

Education leads toward understanding & tolerance.

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One thought on “What will be . . .

  1. Johh Pearson

    The US Military announced that they are extending all benefits to married couples no matter if they are straight or gay. No matter what state they live in. I’m not sure exactly how it works if you have to live on base or not but it looks like they are attempting to set the standard.

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